Saturday, October 31, 2015

Happy Halloween from Prairie Sewn Studios

Happy Halloween from Prairie Sewn Studios

Hope you have a SPOOKTACULAR day! 

Friday, October 30, 2015

Crafty Comment Karma and a Poll About What You Do with Your Quilts

Written by Laura Chaney, daughter


Last week we asked: "How do you share your creative work online?"



Last week responses brought such a big smile to my face. So exciting to see that so many readers share fruits of their labor somewhere on the interwebs. I was a little bit surprised that Flickr didn't have a higher number, but perhaps the days of Flickr have come and gone, and now people have moved onto Instagram.

And speaking of sharing online....be sure to link up at the end of this post!

This week we're asking: "What do you do with your quilts when they're finished?"


Although it might not seems like it from the many works in progress that both Mom and I have going, we DO occasionally finish a quilt. Usually by that point we've decided WHAT will be done with the finished quilt, and it's generally keeping it or giving it to a friend or family member. Sometimes quilts are started with the intended recipient, but sometimes a quilt just ends up being the perfect fit for that person. 

This week we're asking "What do YOU do with your quilts when they're finished?" Keep them? Sell them? Give them away? Even if you sometimes do all of these, choose the answer that you most often do. 


What do you do with your quilts when they're finished?

Keep them for yourself
Give them to a friend or family member
Sell them
Give them to charity
Other (tell us what in the comments)
Quizzes

And now, on to the link-up! 

Not linking up? That's ok! Take a few minutes to check out what other people are linking up this week and spread some good Karma by visiting and commenting on their posts. Comments make a bloggers day!

Crafty Comment Karma


Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Work in Progress Wednesday #49-Full Moon Rising by Whirligig Designs

Written by Linda Chaney, mother

Sometimes a pattern just attracts you and you know which fabric in the stash you plan to use!
That was the case when I saw the pattern, Full Moon Rising by Whirligig Designs, and a sample made by one of the vendors at the Paducah Quilt Show last spring. This pattern is great to use with large scale prints, especially prints you hate to cut up!

Full Moon Rising by Whirligig Designs


When I started to sew the initial panels together, I noticed that they would be perfect as placemats. More cutting and sewing to make placemats may be in order.

Full Moon Rising Placemats


Now to find the time to finish sewing this quilt together!

Full Moon Rising on Design Wall

Linking up with Freshly Pieced and Sew Fresh Quilts. Love link-ups? Be sure to join us each Friday for our Crafty Comment Karma Link-up.

Do you have a favorite pattern to use with large scale prints?

Monday, October 26, 2015

Pumpkin with Piping-Countdown to Christmas 2015

Written by Linda Chaney, mother and Laura Chaney, daughter


Pumpkin with Piping


Today we're sharing the fourth project in our Countdown to Christmas series! As with last week's Mason Jar Vases, you'll need a copy of Contain It! English Paper-Pieced Accessories for some of the templates and the full directions.

This particular post explains how to attach piping to a container, specifically the small convex scalloped top vase with hexagonal base. Remember that these directions could apply to any pattern within the book for attaching piping to an edge.

The photos in this post are specifically about how to add the piping to make this vase from the book into a festive pumpkin, so please refer to pages 60-63 in Contain It! for instructions on making this convex vase. Use orange fabric with green piping to create the pumpkin look!

Various materials can be used for creating the piping, including purchased piping. We usually prefer to make our piping using venetian cord as the inner material. It is thin, flexible and washable.

Supplies needed: 

Directions:

1.Gather the supplies listed above and review the basic container instructions in Contain It! starting on page 9. 

2. Make your templates and cut the following pieces.  As always, be sure to label everything! Follow the directions in the book to fuse the fabric to the stabilizer with double sided fusible tape.

     Template 46 - Inner Side - Cut 6 stabilizer pieces
                                                Cut 6 fabric pieces
                     
     Template 47 - Outer Side - Cut 6 stabilizer pieces
                                                 Cut 6 fabric pieces

     Template 52 - Inner Base (Hexagon) - Cut 1 stabilizer piece
                                                                   Cut 1 fabric piece

     Template 53 - Outer Base (Hexagon) - Cut 1 stabilizer piece
                                                                    Cut 1 fabric piece

3. Use the fused Outer Side as the measuring tool. Cut a piece of cording the length of the side. 6 strips will be needed, one for each Outer Side.

Measure the cording -Pumpkin with Piping


4. Cut 6 strips of cording fabric (the cloth you decide to use to cover the cording) 2 inches longer than the piece of measured cording by 1 inch wide.

Fabric for cording-Pumpkin with Piping


5.  Center the cording in the middle of the fabric, leaving 1 inch of fabric at each end. Fold the fabric over the cording, matching edges. Sew along the center of the fabric next to the encased cording using a zipper foot. Try to sew as closely as possible to the encased cording. This is your piping.

Attach cording with zipper foot-Pumpkin with Piping


6.  Lay a strip of 1/4" double fusible tape along the stitched edge of the piping, starting 1" from the bottom of the piping and ending 1" from the top of the piping. Place Outer Side, right side up, against piping edge with 1/4" double fusible tape and fuse piping to Outer Side. This can be ironed in sections, rotating the curved edge against the piping from bottom to top.

Add fusible tape to piping -Pumpkin with Piping


The piping should lie along the edge of the Outer Side, with an inch of piping extending beyond each end of the Outer Side.

Add fusible tape to piping -Pumpkin with Piping


7.  Place Outer Side with Piping wrong side up. Lay a piece of 1/4" double fusible tape to each free end of piping. Fold extra piping over to the inside (wrong side) of Outer Side and fuse in place. The cording itself should be along the edge of the Outer Side and will not slip out of place when the excess piping is folded to the inside. NOTE: If using purchased piping, try to remove extra cording at each end to eliminate excess bulk.

Add fusible tape to piping -Pumpkin with Piping


The tails of the fused piping should be on the wrong side of the Outer Side.

Add fusible tape to piping -Pumpkin with Piping


8. Repeat the piping steps for the other 5 Outer Sides.

Add fusible tape to piping -Pumpkin with Piping


9.  Once the piping is attached to the Outer Sides, start to sew the container together. Lay out the pieces in the Octopus; sew top edges of Inner Side to Outer Side; sew Inner Side to Inner Base. Sew Inner Sides together, starting at Inner Base.

DO NOT SEW OUTER SIDES together as usually done. Instead, continue to sew Inner Sides together. Then flip the Outer Sides, un-sewn, down over the Inner Sides.

Flip un-sewn outer sides - Pumpkin with Piping


10. Only a partial structure (not all Inner Sides are attached) is shown in the following photographs. Pinch the Outer Sides together. Starting at the top, sew adjacent Outer Sides together, being sure to close the "hole" at the top edge.

Stitch outer sides - Pumpkin with Piping


11. Sew Outer Sides together using a Ladder Stitch. Take a small stitch along the edge of the Outer Side, go through the piping close to the stitched piping edge to the other side, take a small stitch along the edge of the Outer Side, go through the piping close to the stitched piping edge to the other side.  Continue this process along the entire length of the Outer Sides.

Ladder Stitch-Pumpkin with Piping


Midway through sewing two Outer Sides together.

Ladder Stitch-Pumpkin with Piping


Completion of sewing two Outer Sides together. Continue sewing the Outer Sides together until all sides are sewn.

Outer side - pumpkin with piping


12. Check the top edge of the Container to be sure there are no "holes" at the transition from Inner Side to Outer Side. If there are holes, now is the time to close them up. It may be easier to do this by turning the structure inside-out and working from the wrong side. Remember, the structure is squishable!

Check for holes - Pumpkin with Piping


13. Complete the container by attaching the outer base using either a whip stitch or a ladder stitch

Review the detailed directions on pages 9-16 with any questions on general container assembly.

14. Decide what you'll do with your new pumpkin vase!

 A potpourri vase from the local dollar store will nicely inside this container.

Potpourri vase-Pumpkin with Piping


Fill with a beautiful bouquet of flowers to decorate you holiday table!

Pumpkin with Piping


Be sure to post your pictures on the Prairie Sewn Studios Facebook Page or email them to us at contact@PrairieSewnStudios.com.

Next up:


We'll see you next week on November 2 for the fourth project from our Countdown to Christmas with instructions to make the Coaster Set!


Countdown to Christmas


Want to get each project in Countdown to Christmas in your inbox, including a link to a downloadable PDF for all templates and instructions? Join our newsletter mailing list!


 

Friday, October 23, 2015

Crafty Comment Karma and a Poll About Sharing Your Creative Work Online

Written by Laura Chaney, daughter


Last week's poll was all about the kinds of quilts you typically make!


We had a record number of voters, with 92 quilters weighing in! Functional or bed quilts won out with a whopping 96%, leaving art quilts with 4% and show quilts with just 1% of voters.  I'd expected the numbers to show a littler more variety, but I'm not surprised that the functional and bed quilts had the most votes.

In the comments, Daryl from Patchouli Moon Studio made a really great point about how the terms could interpreted by different people. If you hang a bed quilt on the wall is it art? Definitely a great example of how quilts and quilted home goods can blur the perceived boundary between function and design.


poll results Prairie Sewn Studios


This week's poll is all about how you share your creative work online. 


I absolutely love love LOVE sharing my creative work online and also seeing what other people are making around the world. I use Bloglovin' (<-- Follow me here!) as my blog feed reader so that I always know when an author publishes a new blog. I'm still feeling my way through Instagram, but definitely love how people share progress photos of their work. I get some interaction on the Prairie Sewn Studios Facebook page, but really I'm using that to help redirect people to see what we've published on our blog. 

So how about you? What ways do you share your creative work online, either as its in progress or the finished project? Check the boxes for any that you currently use below, and be sure to share any other social media channels that you like. 


How do you share you creative work online?

Blog
Instagram
Facebook
Twitter
Flickr
Online forum such as Reddit, My Quilt Place, etc. (share which one in the comments)
Pinterest
Other
Please Specify:
Poll Maker

And now, on to the link-up! 


Crafty Comment Karma




Wednesday, October 21, 2015

Pacific International Quilt Festival 2015

Written by Laura Chaney, daughter


Pacific International Quilt Festival 2015

My parents' visit to San Francisco last week just happened to coincide with the 2015 Pacific International Quilt Festival (PIQF). Just 40 minutes away from my house, I skipped out of work and hopped in the car with Mom and my partner's mom (who also is a quilter) to make a day of it.

This was our first time to this particular quilt show, and I was impressed by its size and variety! Held in the Santa Clara Convention Center, there was a huge vendor mall and multiple quilt exhibits, including the international exhibit with quilts from all over the world. We only had the one day, so we didn't get to see every single vendor, although I think we did hit all of the quilts in the show.

The beautiful Bernina Q20 Longarm was on display again, and I loved her just as much this time as I did at the Paducah show this year. My partner's mom gave her a whirl and fell in love too! We spent the rest of the trip plotting how we could convince the boys that we needed to make room for this in one of our houses.

Bernina Q20 Longarm

This was my absolute favorite quilt of the show,  located in the international section. Cathedral windows are on my quilting bucket list, and this quilt was absolutely amazing. It was based off of a picture of Earth taken via satellite. 

The Globe Hayabusa Shot

And then of course there were the random finds from the vendor mall. I somehow resisted purchasing them, and actually managed to get out of the show without making a single purchase!

You Miter to Me

Born to Quilt forced to work

This was definitely a great show that I'll return to again next year, hopefully for at least two days so I can spend more time seeing the wonderful quilts and shopping.

What are some of your favorite quilt shows to attend? 


Did you come here from a link-up? Be sure to check out our Crafty Comment Karma link-up that goes up each Friday and remains open until the next one begins the following week. Come link up anything crafty or creative and check out what others are making, too! Click here for our most current link-up! 

Monday, October 19, 2015

Mason Jar Vases-Countdown to Christmas 2015

Written by Linda Chaney, mother and Laura Chaney, daughter




Today we're sharing the third project in our Countdown to Christmas series! As with the Hexagon Based Tulip Vase and the Gift Box with Lid, you'll need a copy of Contain It! English Paper-Pieced Accessories for some of the templates and the full directions.



Supplies needed for ONE container with lid: 

  • Contain It! English Paper Pieced-Accessories
  • Printed copies of Templates 123, 124, 125, 126, 127 and 128 (be sure to check that it printed correctly by measuring the 2" square printed on the pattern piece)
  • 2 fat quarters of fabric (18" x 22")
  • Stabilizer (PeltexTimtex or Buckram) measuring 20" x 25"
  • 1/4" Fusible Tape (we like Steam-a-Seam 2)
  • Iron with Steam
  • Coordinating thread
  • Basic sewing supplies (needle, scissors, thimble, wonderclips or pins etc)
  • Mason or quilted jelly jar.  We provide the templates for three different heights, so you can choose the size jar that works for you.
Ball Quilted Jelly Jars with lid will fit these containers:
      4 ounce quilted jelly jar - short sides
      8 ounce quilted jelly jar - medium sides
    12 ounce quilted jelly jar - tall sides

Ball Regular Mouth Pint Jar with lid (available in different colors!)  - tall sides




In addition to using some of the templates from Contain It! to make this gift box, the book will also serve as the full set of instructions for prepping the materials and constructing the Mason Jar vase and optional lid. Here is the basic outline of the steps, but be sure to also read the instructions for the cube starting on page 25, as this Mason Jar Vase and Lid  can be assembled following the same steps. 

Directions:

1.Gather the supplies listed above and review the basic container instructions in Contain It! starting on page 9. 

2. Make your templates and cut the following pieces. As always, be sure to label everything!

     Template 12 - Inner Base - Cut 1 Stabilizer Piece
                                                 Cut 1 Fabric Piece

     Template 13 - Outer Base - Cut 1 Stabilizer Piece
                                                  Cut 1 Fabric Piece

3. Using Templates 123, 124, 125, 126, 127 and 128 that you printed, create your template and cut the following pieces. Remember to use the 2" square printed on Templates to ensure it printed correctly.

The sides of the Quilted Jelly Jars are given on the same template, denoted by Short, Medium, or Tall.  Make the Pattern Piece by tracing the template to the appropriate height.

     Template 123 - Inner Side - Cut 4 Stabilizer Pieces
                                                  Cut 4 Fabric PIeces

     Template 124 - Outer Side - Cut 4 Stabilizer PIeces
                                                   Cut 4 Fabric PIeces

The Quilted Jelly Jar Lid Container will fit all of the above containers.

     Template 125 - Inner Base - Cut 1 Stabilizer Piece
                                                   Cut 1 Fabric PIece

     Template 126 - Inner Side - Cut 4 Stabilizer PIeces
                                                  Cut 4 Fabric PIeces

     Template 127 - Outer Base - Cut 1 Stabilizer PIeces
                                                    Cut 1 Fabric PIeces

     Template 128 - Outer Side - Cut 4 Stablizer Pieces
                                                   Cut 4 Fabric PIeces

4. Follow the directions for cube construction that begin on page 25. These vases and lid are identical in construction to the cube just with slightly different dimensions to fit your mason or jelly jars. Remember that all of the 3-D containers are constructed in the same way with these basic steps:
  • Make the templates
  • Cut the stabilizer pieces
  • Cut the fabric pieces
  • Fuse the fabric and stabilizer pieces together
  • Assemble the Octopus
  • Sew the Octopus (hand or machine-see pages 13-15)
  • Complete the container with the outside base
  • Remember that if you want a lid for your vase (as seen in the middle vase below), you'll need to use those templates to make a separate container that fits over the Mason Jar Vase.


Review the detailed directions on pages 9-16 with any questions.

5. Decide what you'll do with your new gift box! Keep it for yourself? Or give it as a hostess gift when you attend Thanksgiving or another holiday party? Maybe you could fill the jar up with holiday candy, add the vase lid and give it as a present! 



Either way, be sure to post your pictures on the Prairie Sewn Studios Facebook Page or email them to us at contact@PrairieSewnStudios.com.

Next up:


We'll see you next week on October 26 for the second project from our Countdown to Christmas with instructions to make a Pumpkin with Piping!


Countdown to Christmas


Want to get each project in Countdown to Christmas in your inbox, including a link to a downloadable PDF for all templates and instructions? Join our newsletter mailing list!


 

Friday, October 16, 2015

Crafty Comment Karma and a Poll about Kinds of Quilts

Written by Laura Chaney, daughter


Last week's poll was all about QUILT BACKING! 


Our voters were split 50/50 last week when we asked, "What method do you most commonly use when you make your quilt backing?" Pieced backings and single fabric backings had an equal number of votes, but our commenters noted that it seems to be becoming more common than it was previously to see pieced backings.

quilt backing poll results


This week's poll is all about the KINDS OF QUILTS that you usually make: art quilts, show quilts or functional quilts.


I used to feel a bit sad when I'd go to a quilt show and see quilts on display, and mentally compare them to my own quilts. These show quilts for more intricate, more detailed and more "perfect" than anything I could ever imagine making on my own.

Then, a few years ago Mom and I were at a class a the Paducah show that was all about finishing a show quilt: attaching mitered binding, inserting a hanging sleeve and adding a label. And that's when it hit me, that there are different kinds of quilts, with different purposes, and different steps to making them perfect for their intended use. If you're making a quilt for a grandchild to snuggle under, the mitered binding doesn't have to be perfect for the child to love the quilt. A good lesson for me to learn.


What kinds of quilts do you typically make?

Art quilts
Show quilts
Functional or bed quilts
Poll Maker

And now, on to the link-up!


crafty comment karma

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Work In Progress Wednesday #48 - Blue Hexagon Progress

Written by Laura Chaney, daughter

The weather may still be hot outside, but cold and flu season seems to have started here in California. The sneezes and sniffles have been going around, and this week it was my turn. Tuesday I stayed home, getting lots of rest and fluids (just like Mom taught me). The afternoon found me snuggled into the green couch from my childhood, surrounded by cats and watching The Nanny Diaries on Amazon Prime while I basted hexagons!


All in all I based 23 of them during the afternoon movie (and catnaps). It didn't seem like much of an accomplishment for an entire afternoon, but then I added then I added them to the glass vase I'm storing them in.


Even though I've mostly been basting these just a few at a time, with today's additional 23 it was easy to see that I am indeed making progress. I looked at the pile of squares I had left (an entire charm pack of Ocean Waters Batik cut into 2" squares) and realized that pile had shrunk, while at the same time the vase was over halfway full.


As much as I love English paper piecing, it can sometimes be hard to see the progress when you only have time to work on few pieces at a time. This was a great reminder that it's ok if I only sew in little chunks of time, and that every stitch is a stitch in the right direction.

Linking up with Freshly PiecedSew Fresh Quilts and Life Under Quilts!

Don't forget to vote in this week's poll!



What method do you most commonly use to make quilt backing?

Pieced backing
Single fabric backing
Poll Maker



Monday, October 12, 2015

Gift Box with Lid-Countdown to Christmas 2015

Written by Linda Chaney, mother and Laura Chaney, daughter


Countdown to Christmas Gift Box with Lid


Today we're sharing the second project in our Countdown to Christmas series! As with last week's Hexagon Based Tulip Vase, you'll need a copy of Contain It! English Paper-Pieced Accessories for some of the templates and the full directions.

Supplies needed: 

In addition to using some of the templates from Contain It! to make this gift box, the book will also serve as the full set of instructions for prepping the materials and constructing the box and lid. Here is the basic outline of the steps, but be sure to also read the instructions for the cube starting on page 25. 

Remember, you're making TWO separate containers that fit together, the gift box (cube) and the gift box lid. 

Directions:

1.Gather the supplies listed above and review the basic container instructions in Contain It! starting on page 9. 

2. From Contain It! Make your templates and cut the following pieces. As always, be sure to label everything!

     Template 4 - Cube Inner Base and Sides - Cut 5 Stabilizer Pieces
                                                                         Cut 5 Fabric Pieces

     Template 5 - Cube Outer Base and Sides - Cut 5 Stabilizer Pieces
                                                                         Cut 5 Fabric Pieces

     Template 78 - Lid Inner Base - Cut 1 Stabilizer Piece
                                                        Cut 1 Fabric Piece
   
     Template 80 - Lid Outer Base - Cut 1 Stabilizer Piece
                                                        Cut 1 Fabric Piece

3. Using Templates 121 and 122 that you printed, create your templates and cut the following pieces. Remember to use the 2" square printed on Templates to ensure it printed correctly.

     Template 121 - Lid Inner Side - Cut 4 Stabilizer Pieces
                                                         Cut 4 Fabric Pieces
   
     Template 122 - Lid Outer Side - Cut 4 Stabilizer Pieces
                                                          Cut 4 Fabric Pieces

4. Follow the directions for cube construction that begin on page 25. Remember that all of the 3-D containers are constructed in the same way with these basic steps. Since you're making a box and a lid you'll make two separate containers that fit together to make the gift box.

For the cube you'll use the pieces from Templates 4 and 5. For the lid you'll use pieces from Templates 78, 80, 121 and 122
  • Make the templates 
  • Cut the stabilizer pieces
  • Cut the fabric pieces
  • Fuse the fabric and stabilizer pieces together
  • Assemble the Octopus
  • Sew the Octopus (hand or machine-see pages 13-15).  Remember the Octopus for the lid will look like the Octopus for the Cube - just shorter sides!
  • Complete the container with the outside base
Review the detailed directions on pages 9-16 with any questions.

Countdown to Christmas Gift Box with Lid


Want to make a bonus container? Make just the lid and use it on your desk for post-it notes or paperclips! 



5. Decide what you'll do with your new gift box! Keep it for yourself? Or give it as a hostess gift when you attend Thanksgiving or another holiday party? You can even tie it up with a bow to make it a true "gift box." 

Countdown to Christmas Gift Box with Lid


Either way, be sure to post your pictures on the Prairie Sewn Studios Facebook Page or email them to us at contact@PrairieSewnStudios.com.

Next up:


We'll see you next week on October 19 for the third project from our Countdown to Christmas with instructions to make the Mason Jar Vases!


Countdown to Christmas


Want to get each project in Countdown to Christmas in your inbox, including a link to a downloadable PDF for all templates and instructions? Join our newsletter mailing list!



Friday, October 9, 2015

Crafty Comment Karma and a Poll About Quilt Backing

Written by Laura Chaney, daughter

Last week's poll was all about BINDING!


The results were again just as I suspected. For a slight majority of responses (56%), the method of cutting the binding is project dependent, and the rest always cut straight on the grain. No on responded that they always cut binding on the bias, which I suppose makes sense given the care that must be taken to ensure you don't distort the fabric when working on bindings cut on the grain.

How do you cut your binding?


This week's poll is all about QUILT BACKING.


This poll is about a part of the quilt that you may not see as much, but can be just as beautiful-the quilt backing! When I first started quilting in earnest, I remember quilt backs always being one fabric. It might be two pieces of that fabric sewn together, but the same fabric.

In the last few years I've started to see more and more quilters and artists make quilts that are almost double sided given the level of detail and intricacy that can be on the back of a quilt. Even when the backing isn't super fancy, it's not uncommon to see blocks, or a row of blocks sewn into the fabric backing. To me, it feels like quilt backings with pieced backs are generally more modern quilts, but maybe those are just the ones I've noticed.


What method do you most commonly use to make quilt backing?

Pieced backing
Single fabric backing
Quiz Maker


And now, on to the link-up! 


Crafty Comment Karma